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Supernova 2014J
http://www.boltonastro.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=631
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Author:  rwilkinson [ Mon Feb 10, 2014 7:52 am ]
Post subject:  Supernova 2014J

After hearing on last night's The Sky at Night how this type 1A supernova was "accidentally" discovered last month from London (through a brief gap in the clouds!), I noticed that the sky had cleared here, so decided to go out and have a look for it myself.

As I'd not yet managed to use my new Starwave 80ED this year, that was the instrument which I set up (although my C8 would probably have been a better choice). From a very hasty polar alignment of my mount and using "Last Alignment" followed by a Sync on Alcor, I managed to get onto M82 with my CG5-AGT.
The galaxy (and its companion M81) was surprisingly difficult to see at first due to the very bright moonlight, but once I'd found it, the supernova was easy to identify. I initially used 38mm and 26mm 2" eyepieces, but found that it was best with an old 10mm (1.25") Plossl. I should have tried with a filter in-line too, but they are currently fitted in our filter-wheel.

Author:  rwilkinson [ Fri Feb 21, 2014 10:07 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Supernova 2014J

Last night I managed to do a little imaging with my StarWave 80, for the first time since Christmas!

I noticed after dinner that the sky was clear, but it's been so long since I've been out imaging that by the time I'd got everything out and reminded myself how it all fits together, it had clouded over! :(
But later I did get a clear patch - it only lasted around half an hour, so I had to get set up quickly, but I was able to get 23 mins on M82 (with its supernova):
Attachment:
File comment: M82 with SN2014J. 23x 60-sec with H-alpha filter using Philips (monochrome) webcam on StarWave 80 at f/4.6
m82sn2.jpg
m82sn2.jpg [ 92.13 KiB | Viewed 2850 times ]

Now it struck me that in processing the image to bring out the fainter details of the galaxy, I'd lost the impression of just how bright the supernova is compared with the entire rest of the galaxy, so for comparison here's the same image with linear scaling (as it would appear in the eyepiece):
Attachment:
File comment: Linear-scaled image of SN2014J in M82
m82sn1.jpg
m82sn1.jpg [ 63.85 KiB | Viewed 2850 times ]

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